V/A - Future Sounds of Jazz Volume 13

February 14, 2017

 

 

The phrase ‘future sounds of jazz’ might seem like a paradox to some. It’s easy to characterise jazz as a traditionalist’s genre, one whose heyday came with Miles Davis’ ‘Kind Of Blue’ and whose future is an endless recapitulation of past standards.

 

Yet, the essence of jazz has always been its inventiveness and restless energy in pushing musical boundaries and tastes forward, making future innovations a latent presence within the core jazz sound itself. In the past year, the work of Yussef Kamaal, Shabaka Hutchings and Kamasi Washington, to name just a few of the most talked-about artists, has seen to a release of this latent potentiality in jazz with increasing force. Slowly but surely, the genre is once again making itself heard and new, younger listeners are being encouraged to put aside preconception.

 

There have always been selectors and champions of jazz though, long before major labels and music writers cottoned onto the artists involved. One such influencer is Michael Reinboth, founder of Compost Records and compiler of the ‘Future Sounds Of Jazz’ compilation series. Since founding the Munich-based label in 1994, Reinboth has used the compilation releases as a chance to showcase his hand-picked favourites that embody the Compost ethos of diversity in musical selection. Reinboth made his mark on the German music scene with his club nights that were focused on the intersections between electronic music and jazz, playing anything from disco to broken beat to nu-jazz and electro. Under Reinboth, therefore, the ‘jazz’ moniker applied in the compilation series is one that will make traditionalists of the Wynton Marsalis school shudder. On a first listen to Reniboth’s latest effort, ‘Future Sounds of Jazz Volume 13’, such sonic diversity is certainly still apparent, continuing to widen jazz’s sphere of influence away from just the standards and further into the club.

 

Read the rest of the review in Clash Magazine.

 

[This piece was originally published in Clash Magazine on 13/02/17]

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